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335i high pressure fuel pump

Discussion in 'E90/E91/E92/E93 (2006-2011)' started by Point2mach, Apr 21, 2009.

    • Member

    330indy1

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    Actually Mike Miller has address reduced reliability /reputation/ records for the e90/N54 class cars and thus the increased rate of depreciation in the buyers' guide issues of Bimmer.
    I could have sworn there was a Roundel tech talk article that covered it in months past. :confused:
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    Christoph

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    I had it

    I personally have had 3 HPFP and 1LPFP replaced on my 2008 E92, including all 6 injectors and spark plugs. Latest issue is MISFIRING????????

    I have 47,600 miles on the odo. So I need to make a decision really quick. I may just leave BMW this time for a more reliable car. I miss my E46 sedan, wonderful car.
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    E92Dreier

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    Christoph -

    I too have had codes for misfiring, and one bank running lean.

    Here is my story:
    335i began having long cranks. After a brief illumination of the 1/2 engine light (CEL), I scanned with Bavarian Technic tool. I saw a code '2FBF' - this is indicating fuel pump failure. Then, I called roadside and had my car towed to the dealer.

    The dealer told me that there is an SIB for this issue. We all know about it. I told the dealer that I didn't want the car back until it was fixed. They provided me with a loaner car, shuttle service, and all the assurances you would expect (This was the week after my father's car was in for the same exact symptoms. His software was updated, no parts replaced, still has long cranks).

    I was called and told that the software was updated to prime the HPFP sooner. I asked if any codes were present. They said 'no.'

    I picked the car up, and pulled out of the dealer. My car died immediately, flashing the CEL and SES lights until it shut off. I turned on the hazards, restarted the car and limped into the dealer. After a near aneurysm, I asked for the car to be scanned again while I waited. I told them I would go home and get my own scanner and laptop if necessary, and I would return and scan the car in their parking lot if they balked. Then I would contact the NHTSA and report my findings.

    The dealer scanned the car -- 2FBF again, as well as misfiring on two cylinders. They claimed that this was normal after HPFP failure, and that the fuel rail, injectors, and coils were OK. I asked for a simple leak down test of the pump at my own expense - you would have thought I was asking for the moon.

    I waited 24 hours for approval from BMW NA to change the pump. The pump was changed last week, and yesterday I was already cranking long again.

    I have informed the sales manager of my dealer that future 2FBF codes will force me to reconsider my allegiance to the brand, and to try and lemon my current car. Then they asked me to give them all 10's on their survey.

    If this is what BMW thinks their customers should go through, simply so they can avoid a recall on all HPFPs, I would counsel them that they are being pennywise, but pound-foolish.

    /rant

    Good luck Christoph - I too miss the old days in my various, fully-functioning, BMWs. It seems that the entire fuel delivery system is suspect on all N54 variants, and that BMW failure to address the root cause (HPFP) has exacerbated the problem and led to the failure of other subsidiary components.

    ForcedInduction guest

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    Wow, sounds like another lawsuit in the making? :(
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    eam3

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    It's funny, after driving my mom's 335i, I was mesmerized by having all that power on a smaller 3 but after all the issues with our 535i (my mom's car only has 12K miles and hasn't experienced any of this crap yet - key word being YET), it looks like I'll be keeping my E46 a lot longer than originally planned.

    eabente90 guest

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    I Purchased a 2008 335I with 8400 miles approximately 5 weeks ago and so far no problems but after reading these posts concerning the HPFP needless to say I am a little apprehensive. Does anyone know of a way to check for whether one has the "Newer" version of the HPFP from the updated supplier??

    ForcedInduction guest

    Post Count: 358
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    There is no way to know what HPFP is actually on the engine without removing it which requires considerable work and is not recommended.

    If your selling dealer did the last HPFP replacement they may have a record of the HPFP number installed but it's hardly worth the effort as all of the x35i HPFPs to date fail. The last common P.N. was 13517613933 which is a remanufactured HPFP. There appears to be a newer pump just starting to show up with the last three P.N. digits of "402". Every new HPFP is touted as "the cure" for the problem that has existed for 5 model years and counting... I think BMW is on HPFP design number seven at this point?

    Good luck with your new-to-you BMW.
    • Member

    chvossler

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    Stupid ? Is this relegated to just the 335 e90 & 135i? Or is it also affecting non-turbocharged motors or in other bmw body styles.

    Thanks
    Chuck
    • Member

    eam3

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    If it has the twin turbo motor, it's afflicted. Normally aspirated motors continue the old BMW tradition of happy motoring.
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    floydarogers

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    While true, there is a recent SIB regarding HPFP-related matters - actually regarding the long crank issues - that should guarentee that you have a (fairly) new one, and have the latest software. Google for "SI B13 09 10" It places a little sticker on your b-pillar near the tire-pressure sticker.
    • Member

    E92Dreier

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    Unless your dealer is so incompetent they didn't bother.
    • Member

    eam3

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    Are these issues with the HPFP also happening to cars in Europe or is it a USA only thing? Reason I ask is because I've also heard through the rumor mill that the fuel quality could be an issue.
    • Member

    floydarogers

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    IMO, blaming fuel quality is a canard. The differences in fuel standards between US and EU are so tiny as to be a non-issue. This "story" probably has it's roots the Nikasil problem in the V8 engines in '93. Guess what - they had the same problems (linked to sulfer) in the UK with their all-aluminum I6/M52 in the same period.

    Remember, there are far fewer 335i cars being driven every day over in EU - most of them are weekend cars. 50%-60% of the 3-series in EU are diesel; I wouldn't be surprised if there are more 335i's in the US than in all of EU. One caveat to all this numbers estimates, though: there are DI versions of the N52 in EU, designated as N53.

    ;)I'm a conspiracy-theorist on this subject: national/regional pride requires the "German Engineering" folks in the EU to keep problems with DI engines "secret".

    ForcedInduction guest

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    Unfortunately the HPFP issues have been confirmed on x35i models worldwide including all of Europe including Germany, Australia, Asia, the U.S., etc. It's not the fuel. BMW either doesn't know the root cause or isn't willing to correct the x35i HPFP problem(s) until litigation forces them to.
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    E92Dreier

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    They are making sure to lose me as a customer by handling this matter so ineptly. I will hesitate to purchase any new BMW because I feel that the warranty is a lame duck - yes everything is covered -- but that's only when BMW NA approves it...and they would rather have your car die in the middle of an intersection that simply address the problem right the first time.

    I trust my own maintenance much more than I trust theirs at this point -- and I am at best a hack mechanic -- But I do have some measure of common sense.

    When the time comes to consider a new $50,000 vehicle with 'an Ultimate Warranty,' I may just opt to purchase a $30,000 car and spend the rest of the money on repairs -- because, when the fuel pump fails, I can just change it. I don't need software and computer interrogation to tell me the obvious. And even worse for BMW, I might be so disgusted by my dealership experience that I leave the marque altogether, at least for a while...I'm not running to the dark side yet...but I am losing my enthusiasm for my particular car.

    Clinesdale guest

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    What is the cost of having the dealership replace the HPFP?
    • Member

    bcweir

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    Do you remember the expression "If you have to ask the price, you can't afford it..."

    Unless you can get it installed under warranty or a goodwill repair, skip the dealer entirely. Dealership labor prices of $165 per hour or more are shocking but not unheard of.

    An independent shop can do this for a lot less, and as long as its done according to BMW procedures by a qualified BMW service technician, the work by an independent won't void any other warranties still in effect on the car.

    www.bimrs.org will help you locate a qualified and certified independent BMW service center in your area.

    ForcedInduction guest

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    The reman 933 HPFP runs around $275 exchange plus labor. Labor time for techs who replace these all week long is usually 4-5 hours as they have all the factory test equipment and tools plus lots of practice over the past four model years.

    Cost is one thing but being stranded or involved an accident as a result of the HPFP failure is another story all together.

    Clinesdale guest

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    I met with my BMW service advisor today, and he stated that BMW is now providing 10 years / 110,000 miles coverage for the HPFP due to the excessive failures.

    ForcedInduction guest

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    Years ago NHTSA forced BMW to extend the N54 HPFP warranty for 10 yrs./120,000 miles on all models starting from 2007. The last I heard the warranty covers all N54s sold in the U.S. up thru and including 2010 models. I have not confirmed this but it will likely be extended to include 2011 models of both the N54 and N55 as they are failing also.

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