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lifting and jack placement on a 2002

Discussion in '114 type 1600, 2002, 2002ti/tii (1967-1976)' started by JMCLBMW, Mar 26, 2011.

    • Member

    JMCLBMW

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    Hi,
    I need to know the proper lifting points using a floor jack, and the correct positioning of jack stands under the car. I've searched through the forum and I can't find an answer. Helpfull answers appreciated.
    Thanks:
    • Member

    Inka2002

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    What I Use

    I use the front subframe crossmember on the front, and the differential carrier on the rear, to jack the car up. Then I put jack stands under the frame rails on the front and under the crossmember (in front of the rear axles) in the rear.
    • Member

    JMCLBMW

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    thanks

    thanks for that info, I had come across somewhere recently and I cant remember where an article which warned not to use the front cross member to lift the car. With a 40+ year old car I didn't want to damage anything even though I've been lifting this way for some time. Of course the old gray matter may be showing it's ?????:rolleyes:
    Thanks again
    • Member

    BMWCCA1

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    I always use hockey pucks in the "cradle" of the jack. Helps distribute the load and keeps the edges of the cradle from poking dents in the undercarriage. Get 'em at the sporting goods store for a buck apiece. Stack 'em, too, for those taller cars.

    If your '02 is so flimsy that you can't jack it by either the frame rail, the flat jig position in the floor, or the rocker seam, then all the jack will do is tell you your '02s days are numbered. The cars are so light I've been known to jack the back-end with a board between the diff and the jack. [IMG]
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    MGarrison

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    To add one cautionary note, I had someone relay to me their tale of having their hockey puck break, I think they ended up with a broken toe because they had their foot under the brake rotor. Wasn't on a lighter car like a 2002, but that makes me think hockey pucks are too brittle a rubber to be ideal for a type of jack pad. I managed to get my hands on some very thick (1.5" or more) rubber that works well, but couldn't suggest offhand where to source it. But, some kind of jack pad to keep from tearing up the undercarriage is a good idea. There are jacks with flat jack pads out there. The higher you have to jack the car (like if you need it up as much as possible for pulling a transmission or some-such) the more precarious the jacking process; if you have to jack it up higher than a low jack-stand setting, it might be advisable to use a single jack pad, if any.
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    BMWCCA1

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    Caution is always good advice, especially if you're going to be underneath the vehicle, but your someone must have been using some crappy pucks! I've been using the same ones for years. I've seen jack cradles break, but never a puck. My heavy jack has such a deep cradle that the puck barely rises over the cradle so I figure that's pretty safe. My aluminum "race" jack (Harbor Freight) has a relatively flat cradle with a thin rubber pad. I use pucks on both. Puts the load directly on the center of the cradle that way. Heck, a nice block of oak will work, too. I've broken plenty of pine this way though.
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    MGarrison

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    I've never had a cradle break, but I'm not surprised to hear of it. I forgot the mention, the broken-puck story is also a reminder to use jack stands, only use a jack for raising/lowering the car, and keep all body parts clear until a car is securely on jack stands.

    Since your pucks have held up, it makes me wonder if the material(s) or production process for hockey pucks is any different from what it may have been 20 or 30 years ago.... cheap hockey pucks from China, anyone? :rolleyes:
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    BMWCCA1

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    The oldest, most-scarred puck is unlabeled. The newest has a Dick's gold imprint on one face and says "Czech Republic" around the edge. That one cost a buck. The old one was probably free from a Blues game forty-years ago!

    And, yes, no one should ever get under a car supported only by a floor (or car) jack. Always use jack stands. That should go without saying, though it's likely written all over any commercially available jack these days.

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