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Help Accelerator Problems!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'E30 (1984-1993)' started by rfirebaugh, May 21, 2008.

    rfirebaugh guest

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    I have a 1986 325es manual. It started having the accelerator stick. It was accelerate on its own. I was able to get it home and get it into gear. When I put the clutch in it rpms at 3500!!!! It won't go back down. I have checked the throttle cable also.

    What could this be? Idle Control Valve near the intake cover? Or I have heard Idle Control Unit that is controlled by a stabilizer near the glove box....in a green box....?

    PLEASE HELP!!!! :(
    • Member

    az3579

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    Is the pedal physically sticking? If not, then I'd say you're having the same problem I was having.

    I've heard about this stabilizer you mention near the ECU but I haven't looked into it yet.
    I got around the problem by implementing a plumbing valve inline to the ICV. I disconnected the idle control valve and regulated the amount of air passing via the valve's handle.

    The downside to this is that your idle will not change when cold to something higher to accomodate the cold condition of your engine. You will either have to set the idle to something around 1000 (warm) rpm or set it to the regular ~800 and keep the revs up until the engine warms up a bit.


    Before I implemented this solution, my idle would go straight to 3500rpm as well and would make the car completely undriveable in city traffic because it would keep accelerating despite the lack of applied throttle.

    rfirebaugh guest

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    Ummmm

    The pedal is not sticking. I think I'll try the stabilizer near the ECU first it's in the roof of the glove box. Then head to the ECV in the engine. Brakes were smoking I know it's not the clutch because it still engaging but yes you can't drive it at all. It goes way up to 3500 and I couldn't get in reverse.
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    Bimmerdan

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    It's possible it's an air leak in the intake somewhere. On rare occassions, it's possible for air to leak in, causing the engine management system to add fuel to compensate for the additional air flow.

    It's not likely but it has been known to happen. Before you tear too much apart or spend any money, check for air leaks all the way from the air filter to the intake manifold.
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    az3579

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    This can be accomplished by spraying carb cleaner at the hose and seeing if the idle changes, correct?

    My idle was still screwed up before I plugged in the plumbing valve as a replacement. He is having the same exact problem I had ("have" if I plug back my ICV and set the plumbing valve to 100% open). I remember my brother was spraying something at a hose and the idle changed, saying that was the problem, but I don't remember what he sprayed or where he sprayed. Any other tricks for finding leaks? I've visually inspected all of my hoses and didn't see any faults with any of them (didn't check coolant hoses though as they were replaced)...
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    Bimmerdan

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    Carb cleaner will work fine. Just be careful though because it's very flammable and if you just keep spraying and spraying, you'll build up a lot of fumes. One little spark and you'll be drawing in fake eyebrows for a few weeks.

    If you can find one (or can find a shop that has one), there's a smoke machine specifically designed for this. It pumps pressurized smoke into the intake and it will immediately show you where ANY leaks are. I was a little sceptical the first time a buddy of mine brought one over to try and track down an intake leak on my 2002 but it worked perfectly! It's definitely 'old school' but I'll bet somebody around you has one..

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