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Door Moisture Barrier Source?

Discussion in '114 type 1600, 2002, 2002ti/tii (1967-1976)' started by 272151, Apr 27, 2008.

    272151 guest

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    Just replaced the door brakes on my '76 02 and found the door moisture barriers - those plastic sheets glued to the inside of the doors - are missing. Anyone know of a source? Or how best to just make them? Any problem going without?
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    BMWCCA1

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    Hardware store roll of plastic (Visqueen or other sheet plastic vapor barrier) for a handful of change, an Xacto knife for cutting. Spray adhesive for attaching. I like 3M Spray Trim adhesive. I cut it roughly then trim it with the Xacto once it's in place. I think I still have most of the roll of Visqueen I bought twenty years ago! Going without will ruin your door panels and may even cause leaks into the interior of the car. They're simple and easy to fabricate. Just do it!

    michaelhair1 guest

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    I have heard of using Tyvek (from home construction). It's probably what I'm going to use, but since I'm still dis-assembling (getting ready for paint) I can't tell you how well it works...
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    Michael Salaniuk

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    moisture barrier

    Maximillian imports shipped some to me It is called acella film, and you should be able to order it from them still I think. It has been awhile, 1-800-950-2002
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    BMWCCA1

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    You guys are truly basket cases if you're ordering vapor barrier from a BMW supplier. Nothing against Max, but it's just plastic sheeting. Don't you have a Lowe's or Home Despot near by? ;)

    I think my $2 roll has so far yielded over 20-years of supplying ready-to-cut sheets for many BMWs. Check that; it's been over 30 years! Do you order your tires and oil from BMW, too? :)
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    Bimmerdan

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    I imagine Tyvek would probably work fine. I bought a roll of plastic sheeting from Ace Hardware about 15 years ago and have been using it ever since. Works like a charm.

    There really is no need to get fancy with it, it's just to keep out moisture.
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    BMWCCA1

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    Tyvek is not waterproof. It is designed to breath and pass water vapor, just not liquid. I don't think you need or want water vapor to move from your door cavity to your door cards or panels. The cardboard won't like it. Why even bother when sheet plastic is so darn cheap and readily available? That's what the factory used! That's why Visqueen is called a "vapor barrier" and Tyvek is called a "water intrusion barrier" and is used in house wraps where it needs to breath. Here's what DuPont says about Tyvek's specs:
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    Bimmerdan

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    Like I said, Tyvek probably wouldn't work very well...:D
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    fwardell

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    All advice appreciated. I went ahead with the plastic sheet and spray adhesive method. Like many, I have had the plastic sheeting around for years. Worked just fine, although it was a bear with just myself and the wind - you just can't let that stuff stick on itself! (BTW, I was "272151" who initiated the post but changed name to "fwardell."

    Hobie Dave guest

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    I found something that works real good for sticking the plastic to the door. I used windshield putty made by 3M its black in color and stays soft and sticky so you can take the plastic off and put it back on or just lift up a section and work on something. I too just did the door brake upgrade. it comes in rolls of 5-10 ft about 3/8" wide. i just made it real thin and ran it around the edge of the metal door and just applied the plastic (from Ace Hardware) to the door.:) Works great!

    AIREDALE guest

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    Doors

    I hesitate to say this but on my '02 I am going to make some small limber holes on the bottom so any accumulated dew / condensation or rainwater has a place to go.

    Before you close up the door take some time to clean and dry the inside and if the metal is nice and clean, spray a good quality anti-rust primer, a few thin coats. A self-etching primer like zinc chromate is hard to beat.

    I also reccommend putting in foil-backed adhesive foam insulation on the inner skin- it not only works to control the heat a little but deadens the sound and tincanning - you may have to make a few sections at a time to try and fill as much of the area as possible.

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