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ATE PremiumOne Slotted or Centric Premium Cryo-Stop?

Discussion in 'E46 (1999-2006)' started by SDKmann, Jul 13, 2009.

    SDKmann guest

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    Ok so I posted this on E46Fanatics but in order to get a faster response and since I regard this site as the one with better information and a lot less BS I thought Id post it here. Im ordering braking components and ran into a bit of a problem. I thought I wanted ATE PremiumOne slotted rotors and a number of people gave a few positive words about them but when adding the components to my cart noticed the Centric Premium Cryo-Stops. The ATE's cost $73 and the Centric Premiums cost $65. The cost is close enough that its basically irrelevant. I saw a number of positive reviews of the Cryo-Stop's too including a positive review of them when used with Hawk HPS pads which is also what Im using. Which rotor will be the best of the two? The car is a seasonal daily driver that will see driving schools, eventually some track time and possibly some auto-x time. Im planning on using the rotors with the aforementioned Hawk HPS pads, SS brake lines of some sort and ATE TYP 200 fluid. Speaking of fluid, how much fluid do I need to completely change my car over from stock fluid to ATE? Any quick answers will be appreciated as I want to order these ASAP. Thanks in advance.
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    shanneba

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    1 liter of brake fluid should be enough, I usually buy two at a time to make sure.
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    steven s

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    +1, I've never gone through more than 1 liter, but always have an extra can on the shelf.
    And remember, the shelf life of an opened can of brake fluid is very short.
    I discard any brake fluid that is not used.
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    CRKrieger

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    For that kind of use, it really hardly matters which rotors you use. OEM would probably work as well. You always run the risk of warping rotors on track as well as in stressful daily driving. Maybe the Cryo-Stops are more resistant to this; I don't know. For the price, give 'em a shot. Worst case, you replace them after a set of pads. Autocross hardly bears mentioning. Autocross is easy on brakes.
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    az3579

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    I have Cyro-stop rotors and no complaints so far.
    I don't know how well they last because I've only been to 1 track day since I had them installed. After about 4-5 autocrosses, they're still good.

    SDKmann guest

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    Yeah I ended up ordering the Cryo-stops earlier today. Any big differences noticed from stock? A subie guy reviewing the Hawk HPS in conjunction with the Cryos and ATE fluid said it was a night and day difference. Im hoping to see similar results.
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    az3579

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    Well I couldn't really tell you the difference because I'm running the same pads that I ran before I swapped my pads/rotors. Hawk HPS pads are amazing. They dust quite a lot though, but I'd rather have excellent braking performance than no dust. :)


    What I can tell you is that I push my car pretty hard on the track. There was no fading to be had with this combo (Cyro-Stop and Hawk HPS pads). At my first or second track day, I had OEM pads on with OEM rotors, and they were fading near the end of the day. Since I went Hawk HPS, no fading. Period.

    But, keep in mind, my car weighs a lot less, and has a lot less power, so it doesn't have to work as hard.
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    MGarrison

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    That may be, but your brakes are a lot smaller, too. I think E30 stock brakes are adequate for the majority of circumstances, but BMW stuck larger 5-series brakes on the E30 M3; larger brakes on a car weighing roughly the same as the stock vehicle upon which it was based.

    In any case, brake fluid with a higher boiling point combined with stainless brake lines and higher-performance pads should, in theory, make for less susceptibility to brake fade.

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