Hello there and welcome to the BMW Car Club of America.

If you are a BMW CCA member, please log in and introduce yourself in our Member Introductions section.

Track my 335i?

Discussion in 'E90/E91/E92/E93 (2006-2011)' started by dhc3, Aug 31, 2009.

    dhc3 guest

    Post Count: 11
    Likes Received:0
    Hey all,

    Recently purchased a 2008 335 coupe, manual trans, sport seats and suspension. A tremendous car!
    But now that I have had the car for 4 months and 7K miles I am starting to realize that in order to fully understand it, I must take it to the track.
    I am experienced with drivers ed, I have done 100+track days and am a driving instructor with Porsche club.
    Are there any particular concerns, preparation, etc. regarding the 335 that I should know about? Mechanical issues, brake or handling concerns, specific to the 335 that I should know about? Thanks!

    dhc3
    • Member

    CRKrieger

    Post Count: 1,616
    Likes Received:20
    Not to be insulting, but, with your background, hardly anyone here is more qualified to make those judgments than you are. My advice? Drive it and find out for yourself where it's weak. [As far as we know so far, it doesn't tear out the rear suspension mounts.]

    mlweaver guest

    Post Count: 44
    Likes Received:0
    The only weakness likely to pop up is the infamous problem with high oil temps ... if the oil gets hot enough the engine will convert to "limp home mode" (severely limited RPMs and power). This has been reported several times at track events (even in cars with the factory supplemental oil cooler). No cure for it except the mega-buck Dinan oil cooler transplant.
    Just be compulsive with cool-down laps, I suppose?
    Have fun!

    bl335i08 guest

    Post Count: 55
    Likes Received:0
    That's good to know. Thanks, Mark!

    dhc3 guest

    Post Count: 11
    Likes Received:0
    How about the run flats? Any issues reported using run flats at the track?
    dhc3

    mlweaver guest

    Post Count: 44
    Likes Received:0
    I've not used run-flats at the track, so I can only offer my theories: there's nothing inherently wrong with run-flat tires that prevents high performance. There just isn't a market for R compound, high-grip run-flat tires. So most "track rats" dislike them because they aren't as grippy as regular high performance options that they are familiar with.

    Here's a consideration: the run-flat tire on the car has a stiffer side wall - that stiffness is already factored into the suspension compliance by the engineers. If you switch to a regular tire, your suspension may be MORE compliant than designed, and that may not be a happy thing at the track. My advice is just run the car as you intend to drive it on the street - it's not a race. If you are going to compete (autocross, time trials, etc.) then you need a dedicated track car with competition tires.

    A little OT rant: the run-flat technology is just an awkward intermediate stage in the development of NON-PNEUMATIC tires (no air at all) which is where we need to evolve.
    • Member

    Wretched

    Post Count: 229
    Likes Received:0
    My last track day I used the stock run flats and was a bit surprised by how well they held up. I tortured them pretty hard and am still putting miles on them... Tire pressure will likely be the worst part about them as in trying to find the right one. It's just not the same as "normal" tires. Try not to go insane!

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    It was NOT wet but left a neat brake dust flow pattern!

    [IMG]

    dhc3 guest

    Post Count: 11
    Likes Received:0
    Yeah, tire pressures can be a challenge.
    I just feel a great need to take this car and have some track fun with it. The handling, power, and brakes are all just so great, there is really no way to fully experience them on the street.
    Plus the exhaust just sounds so damn good under full throttle.
    dhc3
    • Member

    Wretched

    Post Count: 229
    Likes Received:0
    You will be amazed how good those brakes are! I only hit ABS one time and the G forces were incredible! I kept driving in deeper and deeper and the brakes responded perfectly every time! Nice perfect even braking with no "OH CRAP" events from them! They never warped or for that matter squealed but made tons of brake dust. My rotors look... like they have been very hot! Even after such abuse during the drive home I couldn't tell the car was tracked simply amazing!

    lbladams guest

    Post Count: 1
    Likes Received:0
    Oil temp is main concern

    I have an 07 335. Oil temp is the main concern. I do not use the run flats. Personal choice. I did spring for the Dinan oil cooler over stock and it does make a significant difference.

    dhc3 guest

    Post Count: 11
    Likes Received:0
    So if I was to keep an eye on oil temps I should be ok? How hot is too hot, i.e., where do I start to get into trouble.
    My goal is to do a track day to better understand the dynamics of the car. And also to be able to hold the loud pedal to the floor for a nice run up thru the gears, get a feel for the brakes, a little heel toe, etc. An 8/10's run. At what temp would it be good to back off and let it cool down?
    Also, is it neccessary to let the engine run and let the turbos spool out after a track session? I know some of the older Porsches need to do this.

    dhc3
    • Member

    EuroWerkz1

    Post Count: 160
    Likes Received:1
    All of these potential issues seem to also be related to when the car was built. 07-early 08's seem to get hotter and also have more of an issue with the automatic panic braking interferring with proper braking technique. I also think the Dinan software seems to make the oil actually run cooler and I have been told by the Dinan rep ( I am a Dinan dealer) that is due to reprograming of the water pump rpm and tuning of the boost pressure related to RPM. All I know is several of the cars I have flashed seem to be better equipped to handle the track now, not to mention pretty damn fast for a "3" series.:D

    ForcedInduction guest

    Post Count: 358
    Likes Received:4
    That's what it was made for. It's the ultimate driving machine after all. :D

    ForcedInduction guest

    Post Count: 358
    Likes Received:4
    Opinions vary but synthetic oil is just fine at 280 F. though most people don't like to run the engine that hot for long periods. A half-hour track session is not a problem IMO. The BMW electronics dial back the power when the engine oil temp reaches 300 F. so that should tell you where not to go. ;)

Share This Page