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Track Day Tires

Discussion in 'Driving Schools' started by laotsu, Oct 2, 2013.

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    laotsu

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    I have a 1998 Z3 Roadster currently running Bridgstone RE-11s. I would like to hear suggestions on what tires you like.
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    steven s

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    Are you looking for high performance tires or R-comps?
    How many events have you done?
    Track pads?
    Have you reached the limits of your current tires?
    Do you have a dedicated set of wheels?
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    Satch SoSoCalifortified

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    I like Bridgestone RE-11s...
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    ChristopherG

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    Bimmerworld usually has some pretty good deals on lightly used Continental challenge tires. Set of 4 225/45/17 for $300 plus shipping currently. Pretty solid deal for a set of slicks with most of their life left.
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    Joey Syracuse

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    Hello I have the same question . I'm looking for increased grip over my all season Toyo Proxes. Thinking of using the BF Goodrich g force r-1. Does anyone have Hpde experience with these on an Mcoupe? Also should I stay with the 17 inch wheels or go to 18s? Thanks. Joe
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    MGarrison

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    Are you at a point in your learning curve w/ hpde driving where the tires are now holding you back from progressing further? Generally speaking, once you've gotten to the point where you're fully exploiting your car's potential in stock form, the next step would be upgrades like tires, etc.

    Everyone has their own priorities - for me, since driver's schools aren't a race where the most expensive, stickiest, and shortest-lived tire will be the most competitive and yield the lowest lap times, I'm more interested in consistent performance characteristics during 1/2 hr. at-a-time driving sessions, tread-life, and price/performance value ratios. Towing my car, I'm typically not focused on what's a great tire to drive to the track, through the weekend, and back home.

    17's vs. 18's -

    First, bigger is always more expensive, so it's worth considering any advantages or disadvantages.
    18's have a bigger rolling diameter, so, they'll have less rpms than 17's, which may allow tires to more slowly reach optimal temps and maintain longer, before starting to get hot and 'going off'. However, 18" wheels are heavier than 17's (as long as your wheel selection includes such considerations), which is a negative for performance suspension, and a bit of weight drag on acceleration. They may also raise your center of gravity, unless you can't choose similar low-aspect ratio tires in 17's - it's worth keeping in mind that most probably wouldn't notice the dynamic driving difference from having such a nominal difference in center-of-gravity & ride-height. If using 18" wheel/tire combo means a larger rolling diameter than what you'd get with 17's, then you're also effectively changing your differential ratio to negatively effect acceleration. However, depending on the track and your gearing, that might be offset by not running out of revs in some places, meaning it might be possible to eliminate time-wasting upshifts, compared to running out of revs on 17's.

    If you shop around enough, 17" wheels should be lighter than 18's, reducing unsprung weight, maintain or help acceleration, & keep or lower your center of gravity, as long as you can find low aspect-ratio tires in the diameter you need. 17" tires typically will cost less than 18's. I usually opt for track tires with a treadwear rating of 100, as I know the super-sticky and much more expensive 40-treadwear rated Hoosiers && BFG G-Forces won't last particularly long. They're made to win races, so, treadlife is given up in favor of maximum grip. I've been using Nitto's lately for track tires, but have used Toyo R888's & Toyo R1's (shaving to 6/32's also costs extra, but kept me from too much slip angle, treadblock squirm, or potential chunking issues from running them at full tread depth. 17's will get to temp faster, but also peak and fall off faster - this may not be particularly noticeable, considering the short session times typically @ hpde's,
    Joey Syracuse likes this.
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    Joey Syracuse

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    M. Thank you! I appreciate the reasoned advice. Many of my fellow drivers at the track go with r1s but seem to go through them rather quickly. And for me those are darned expensive Driving sessions not to mention having to figure-out how to get them to the track and back. I'm leaning toward just changing out my Proxes4s for the nittos or 888s as you suggest and staying with the stock rims. It seems to make more sense for my situation. Thanks again.
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    steven s

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    R1 or RA1?
    My RA1s do wear down and I start with full tread.
    But once worn down they last a long time as long as you monitor the wear by flipping them on a regular basis.
    Mine are not staggered so I can pick and choose my corners.

    I ran a set of Nittos one season. I don't think they got good until the weekend they started to cord.
    I'm back to RA1s.

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