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Stillborn E34 M5 convertible

Discussion in 'E34 (1989-1995)' started by bcweir, Nov 29, 2009.

    • Member

    bcweir

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    AJWhite

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    Wow, what a car. They made a big mistake in not producing that car. It is awesome. An absolute classic. Thanks for sharing that photo and link. It makes my head hurt thinking that they killed the project. I want that car!
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    bcweir

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    I completely agree

    I believe it would still be possible to build such a vehicle -- with enough money that is.

    Basically, you're just lengthening the doors and modifying the rest of the sheetmetal. The car would still have the same interior room as the sedan because it's otherwise the same bodyshell.

    I should point out that much more recently, Chrysler made a successful conversion of the 4 door PT Cruiser into a production model two door PT Cruiser convertible. It most certainly CAN be done.

    A few years ago, I also saw a concept E32 touring wagon. BMW never actually produced for public consumption, but it was made with some E34 touring wagon parts. The whole thing looked factory. If you look up E32 touring, I believe you can still find a few pics of it.
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    az3579

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    I think the idea of a 5 series convertible is appalling, in exactly the same way that I think an M3 or M6 convertible is appalling.

    Any convertible is appalling to me. Why? They're not allowed on the track.
    Keep the M cars free from convertible-ness; it's not what they're meant to be for. :mad:




    *prepares to get flamed from convertible purists*



    (I have to admit though, that E34 M5 vert looks badass...)
    • Member

    bcweir

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    Which is why this "free enterprise" thing is such a terrific thing

    Some of us LIKE convertibles (myself included), regardless of whether they will ever see a track.

    Perhaps when you are heading up the Car Police, you'll be in charge of what someone else can or cannot buy.

    For the record, my 750iL has a factory limited top speed of 155 mph. The fact that it can do a buck-fifty doesn't by itself make the vehicle an ideal track car. My car's 4200 pound curb weight no more qualifies or disqualifies my vehicle as a track car any more than the presence of a solid or folding roof. However, for practical purposes, any 7-series would be a far from ideal track vehicle due to its size and weight. But just because a 7-series is too big and heavy to be a race car doesn't mean it shouldn't be available for purchase.

    I happen to love my 7-series. That should be the only qualification for owning any BMW, M or otherwise -- NOT the vehicle's fitness for a race track.

    I should also note that most open-wheel type race cars, such as CART, Indy and Formula One, have no proper roof, and are considered to be open race cars.
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    tiFreak

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    who says you need money? :rolleyes:

    [IMG]

    but seriously that's an awesome car, I wonder if they still have the concept?
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    bcweir

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    I suppose anything is possible.

    You're going to need tools, metalworking skills, and body materials. I'm sure some cash is going to factor in somewhere -- even if only for some liquid refreshment from time to time.

    I suspect they probably still do have the concept locked away in some warehouse. It would be a terrible pity to destroy such a beautiful vehicle. About the only reason I can think of that automakers destroy vehicles is if they are engineering prototypes for new powertrains under development or new safety systems that mandate destruction of the vehicle. That car presumably has only a modified body. Everything else looks factory on the car.

    Another example is that I think GM still has the one prototype for the stillborn 1990 Pontiac Fiero that they trot out for shows from time to time. GM killed the Fiero after the 1988 model year, ironically on the same year they finally got the handling fixed on the car (GM went with a cheaper and less effective suspension design for the previous four model years).

    [IMG]

    That's a somewhat ugly chop job on what looks like a Honda Civic, though. I hope its just a work in progress
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    az3579

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    I would hope not. That thing is compromised, and is unsafe for road use in my opinion.
    I think that thing would snap in an accident. That's what it looks like at least.
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    tiFreak

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    the roll cage looks like it goes all the way to the front, probably makes it a little safer
    I've always wanted to sawzall the roof off of a car myself, might not be safe but it sure would be funny :D
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    AJWhite

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    I think "appalling" is a strong word for your dislike of an M car convertible. I can understand you want to have a slot (use) for those cars. However most people who purchase a new M car are not putting them to use on the track.

    Your disdain for a 5 series (non M) convertible is also misplaced. I think it would be a neat limited edition. I have a 540 (yr 2000) sport, and it looks great, but as a convertible it would be a real stunner and a true collector car in a couple of decades.

    This is a fun topic, and thanks for starting the thread. My head still hurts looking at the car, and knowing they killed it right before production. AAAAHhhhhhh......I hope that BMW kept that car, or let someone take it home and enjoy driving it.

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