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Someone put a MINI on the cover of my June Roundel....

Discussion in 'Roundel Magazine' started by thejonross, Jun 6, 2013.

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    thejonross

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    I should mention that I like MINI's, just about everything about them. However, I'm not a MINI enthusiast.

    Of course, BMW AG builds our favorite "British" hatchback but I'm puzzled as to why it made the cover of our club magazine. I'm in favor of including other marques within the pages of our publication, but something other than a 1,3,4,5,6,7,8,Z,X on the cover just feels a little weird.

    just my $.02.
    CRKrieger likes this.
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    Greg E34

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    And they wasted 7 pages of what passes for "the voice of the bmwcca" on this non BMW crap.

    Satch, I was not happy with the "re-tooling" of Roundel, but this is effed up.

    This sucks!
    CRKrieger likes this.
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    CRKrieger

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    What they ^^^^^ said.
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    floydarogers

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    Gosh, why is everyone so hacked off? No-one complained when Satch was pictured on the cover in a Mini 'vert a few months ago.

    Hate to be blunt, but there are probably more Mini owners reading Roundel than 2002 owners...
    mrsbee likes this.
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    Satch SoSoCalifortified

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    A Mini first graced our cover in May 2012—did you miss it?

    I remember the time a few members were pissed when Yale Rachlin featured an Isetta on the cover... and filled that issue with Isetta stories.

    Yale was also the one who used to say, "It's not about the cars—it's about the people!" I think that's mostly true; people with a passion for driving, for the thrill of a winding road, for the camaraderie of like-minded gearheads: that's the Club for me, and I don't care whether the object of an individual focus is a 2002ti, a Z3 M roadster, a Mini JCW, or an M6 Gran Coupé.

    Remember Kay Segler? That's right, the man who, as head of BMW M GmbH, brought us the 1 M coupe. Now he's the honcho at Mini. At the LA Auto Show, he spent a passionate twenty minutes pointing out the hot-rod features of the Mini GP, making me itch to get my fingers on one. I think Mark Buehler's trying to borrow one for an autocross, and then he'll write it up for Roundel.

    Is it a BMW? Not entirely. But then, neither was the Dixi. The Isetta was an Italian Rivolta design—but it was arguably the salvation of the company. What about the BMW truck? Do you remember the furor over BMW having the temerity to build the X5? (Yes, we put that truck on the cover as early as 2000.) Which is more a BMW: an E30 316i, a 740Li, or a Mini GP? In Club terms, what is the spiritual descendant of "the car that built the Club," the 2002? I really don't think it's the M6 Gran Coupé, do you?

    Part of the interesting nature of a club full of diverse opinions is what I have always called the "more Bimmer than thou" attitude: My BMW is the best thing the company ever built; your BMW sucks. Yes, the E30 M3 is the REAL M3... so should we not hang out with people who love their E36s, E46s, E90/92/93s? What about that audacious X6 M? Shouldn't we ban SAVs from our driving schools? (Oh, wait: We only ban open-top cars from our driving schools....)

    While some may be shocked, SHOCKED to find a Mini on our cover, I think the world—and the Club—may survive. And I thought Mike Self's story on the car was pretty damn good writing.
    kgmoodyz3 likes this.
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    thejonross

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    Looks like I opened a can of worms...haha.

    I very much enjoyed Mike's story, just wanted to make a comment.

    Thanks for your hard work Satch
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    Greg E34

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    I think Mike did a great job with the story. Someone should submit it to the voice of the Mini Cooper club, whatever that may be.

    Yes, the club will survive, as will Roundel, although I question it being the voice of the BMW Car Club of America.

    Satch, both the Dixi and the Isetta featured Roundels. I've looked the Minis over many times and have yet to find one on the icon of British motoring.

    Kay Segler was the head of BMW M. He's now at Mini. This happens in the car industry, just as it does in many other walks of life. Larry Shinoda worked on the Corvette Stingray and the later Mako Shark design of the vette while a designer at GM. He later moved on to the Boss 302 Mustang. That don't mean the Mustang is a Chevy does it?

    Mike's story was great. He really is a talented wordsmith. You should have him working on stories about BMWs.
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    steven s

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    I think my calipers are stamped BMW. Only place I noticed.
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    1LRM3

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    having just joined bmwcca, i was a bit surprised to see a Mini on the cover myself. it was my very first issue of Roundel, which i have heard nothing but great things about. with that said, while not interested in the write up on the Mini, i can tell the writers of the mag express passion and knowledge. so if i did not miss it, how about a M write up... been 40 years of M and would love some history! :D
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    MGarrison

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    1LRM3

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    Satch SoSoCalifortified

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    Just for you: the July cover is an M car. In Texas.
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    1LRM3

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    That is awesome... I have been an M*thusiast since I was a little kid. It was the E9 that hooked me and then while I adore the E30, it was the E46 that gave me years of pure joy and adrenaline with its inline 6. Now in a spec. ed. LRP E92, I feel the muscle and hope it becomes that "blue chip collectible."

    And TX certainly has some beauties! Bimmers that is!!! :p
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    Satch SoSoCalifortified

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    An E9 M car? Well, I suppose the CSL counts...
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    1LRM3

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    Agreed Satch... I should have clarified... only the CSL E9, with the 3.2. That was a wild car for its day... and pretty cool with that huge spoiler!
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    BMWCCA1

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    There you go presenting your limited knowledge of BMW history as fact.

    I guess the membership deserves what they get these days!
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    1LRM3

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    Not sure I follow your post apart from the fact that I do not believe it was the salvation of BMW.

    On the lighter side, a BMW no less M on the cover of the mag.... not bad for my second issue :)
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    BMWCCA1

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    I thought you said you didn't understand my post?

    Oh yeah, you're new here. So you probably assume the infallibility of El Jefe.

    Well, he tries! And he used to surround himself with people who could tell him when he was wrong before it got in print.

    Welcome!
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    1LRM3

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    yes I am a rookie here :D
    mrsbee likes this.
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    Satch SoSoCalifortified

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    Phil is correct; I certainly get things wrong on occasion! But I am not sure which of my comments evoked the latest snippiness: Was it my reference to Rivolta, who sold Isetta licensing rights—along with the tooling to build them—to BMW in 1955, or the assertion that the bubble car "saved the company"? Certainly it provided some vital cash flow until the 700 came along. But most consider the "Neue Klasse" 1500 to be "the car that saved the company." Certainly it turned the company around, technologically and financially.

    However, the mid-'50s might very well have seen the demise of BMW if it were not for Isetta sales.

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