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Snow Tires

Discussion in 'Wheels & Tires' started by jhcurtiss, Oct 17, 2008.

    jhcurtiss guest

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    I just picked up my 2008 M3 Sedan and live in Minnesota. I plan to drive it year around so I need to get it fitted for the best snow tires I can find as soon as possible. The dealer has a wheel and tire combo for $3,150. What are my best options for combos, or just tires for my current wheels?

    Jbeene guest

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    Try the Tire Rack

    Dunlop Wintersport M3's are very good. Have had several sets.
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    MGarrison

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    one option to consider - tire rack only showed 3 brands in their recommended sizes for 18" wheels - didn't check 19" - this included tire pressure monitoring sensors - If you go w/ 'The Rack', might be better to order via phone and talk to someone about specifics, what w/ the tire pressure system, etc., and make sure it all should work.

    Jbeene guest

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    Actually if you do call ask for Gary or e-mail gary@tirerack.com.

    He is their BMW guru and will be able to fit something together for you that may not appear on the web-site.

    lugnut guest

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    I second the opinion on the Dunlop M3 snows. Very good tire for the slippy stuff. Again, stick with tire rack. I would also go with a steel wheel from them as well, unless you got the wheel protection package from your dealership. I wouldn't want to slip into a curb with the stock wheels....

    MVF4rider guest

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    The Michelin Pilot Alpin PA3 just best the Dunlop M3 in ADAC's winter tire test (ADAC is a German auto club if you're unaware...best in the world too). Either is more than up to the task. I went with the Michelins as they were 10 Euros less per tire here, and rated better...

    BIMMIR guest

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    Has anyone used studded tires all around on a rear drive BMW? If so, how does this work?
    Any reason why you would not do so on a BMW?

    Jbeene guest

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    I think the only thing that would hold you back are local laws. Some places don't allow them.

    I don' think I could stand the sound on dry pavement though.
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    330indy1

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    question>>>> what is the lower temp limit to run summer tires if the pavement is dry in the winter? 30 degrees? 25 degrees? 40 degrees?

    rgtp4jnl guest

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    Tires

    I as well am about to equip my 128i convertible hoping to drive it daily with snows.Tire rack has encouraged 16" but the 17" look nicer. Any opinions between 16" and 17" Dunlop winter sports. I live in Philadelphia. Thanks, rgtp4jnl

    BIMMIR guest

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    In Maine the laws allow studded tires in winter only, and on all 4 corners. I have them on my 2 daughters front drive toyotas. They are loud when it's dry, but these little cars are like tanks in the winter. I've never tried studs on a rear drive.
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    MGarrison

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    If the road is dry, if there's some absolute limit where some kind of damage _might_ occur, I'd think it'd have to be waaaaaay subfreezing, 'cause the tire rubber will flex unless it's frozen. That doesn't mean you'd have much grip though. But I doubt there'd be much of a problem on dry roads down to ohhh... 15° just as a safe guess, probably a lot lower - they're just not engineered to work well in cold temperatures. If it's a concern, find out from the tire manufacturer if they have a temp. zone that they _shouldn't_ be driven in, or ask the Tire Rack.

    It does beg the question - at what temperature will a summer tire freeze?

    Personally, aesthetics are one of the last things I'd be concerned about when it comes to snow tires. I'd take the Tire Rack's recommendation - they have a full tech section on winter tires that you might find helpful to check out - on the TR site, check their popup menus: Products: Winter: Winter Tire Tech.

    http://www.tirerack.com/winter/tech/techpage.jsp?techid=126

    I think another reason higher profile tires may help w/ winter grip is having a sidewall w/ more give, comparatively. Another plus, you have more tire to help soak up bumps and perhaps avoid pothole damage. Obviously, the less sidewall you have, the more likely you are to bend a rim, and I would imagine Philly has plenty of mediocre roads in winter.
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    CRKrieger

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    Two data points:

    I once ran a pair of R compounds a little too late in the year. Late as in -20°F. I could hear them crunching as I drove. The softer tread compound later looked like a cartoon character hit on the head with a mallet; shattered but intact. They worked OK the next year, but looked like hell.

    My current Yoko Advan track tires recommend that you not even store them below 14°F! So they're hibernating in my cellar ...

    Jbeene guest

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    My experience with soft summer tires suggests that at any lower than about 5 degrees celsius they become hockey pucks with very little grip. If you do hit something slippery the car takes on all the dynamic handling traits of a curling rock. I discovered this in my 04 ZHP, holy snap oversteer Batman!

    It has started to cool off here so I put the winters on today even though it is not supposed to snow for awhile.

    I'm running Pirelli Winter 240 Snowsports in 235 - 35 19 on 19 by 8.5 rims all around.

    First try with Pirellis since we had them on our Volvo SUV a few winters back. I had Scorpion snows then and I'd say they were average at best. The 240's get good reviews and I'm going to try 19's for the first time. Usually I go minus 1 but I had a set of 19 inch rims kicking around so I thought I'd give it a go.

    Have always had good luck with the Dunlops. In comparison to the Pilot PA2's I had on my last car the Dunlops were quite a bit better for the conditions we get here.
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    CRKrieger

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    The Pirelli winter tires I've used were similar to the other Pirellis in terms of mediocre quality, belt separations, etc. Not outstanding winter traction, either.

    I tried the Blizzak route and found they stick, but they also squirm like you're driving on nightcrawlers. Didn't like that.

    I've never been crazy about Michelin anything, but the Arctic Alpin was decent.

    Finally, I hit the Dunlop M3s. A V-rated snow tire! All traction and no problems.

    elcarajo guest

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    I used stock width, 17", studded Pirelli Winter Carvings on my 04 330i ZHP and they worked perfectly. Maine had massive snowfall while I was home and we spent a week touring New Brunswick, but in all conditions and on all road surfaces I wouldn't slip even when I wanted it to. The studs didn't make excessive noise, and handling remained comparable to UHP's (forget which), although I didn't push it too hard. Highly recommended.

    Now I'm trying to put hi-po snow tires on my 08 M3 and I can't find anything that will fit my stock 19's. I'd much rather wait to replace the rims until next year, so I don't want to go that route now. Does anyone have any suggestions?


    THX
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    E92Dreier

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    40 degrees is the recommended lower limit for UHP tires -- There may be some variation across manufacturers and different compound mixes -- I have heard 40 consistently though.

    Jbeene guest

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    Update:

    After moderate snow and some slick roads I'd steer people away from the Pirelli 240's. They are garbage IMHO.

    The Dunlop M3's or 3D's are way, way, way better tires. Pirellis are decent in the dry but I'm getting tons of wheelspin on even cool damp pavement. Didn't have this problem in the Dinan 335i on Dunlops and it was putting down another 120 ft lb of torque.

    These Pirellis are junk. My last set for sure.
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    Jeff Gomon

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    Nokian Snow Tires

    I haven't heard mention of the Nokian snow tire line. I know they are usually a bit more expensive than some other brands. Having had experience with the Nokian WR's on a 99' 740iL, it turned that into a winter beast. I know the Hakkapeliitta line is great and in comparitive testing I have found usually finds Nokian's at the top or very near it, depending on model.
    Interestingly, both Tire Rack nor Discount Tire Direct carry the Nokian Line. Given their performance and positive reviews, I find that odd.
    Anyone else have a set of Nokian's and want to give perspective of their performance?
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    CRKrieger

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    Studs are illegal in Minnesota - and Wisconsin.

    Nokian has a high performance snow tire. The Hakka Q, IIRC. It isn't all that special compared to other modern hydrophilics.

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