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Rear ended, insurance fun

Discussion in '114 type 1600, 2002, 2002ti/tii (1967-1976)' started by Craig25569, May 21, 2018.

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    Craig25569

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    I have a 1971 2002 which was just rear ended (woman on phone).
    I live in N. CA and have taken the car to two shops, one recommended by Geico where there the car was written up by the insurance company adjuster (although not in his book so apparently used data from a 1985 three series). The shop said they didn't work on cars that old.
    I took it to my mechanics recommended shop and and they and a new adjuster said it would be quite expensive to fix although all body panel damage. At minimum it needs a new rear panel, a pull to the side panels (bulged) and all the rear lights, bumper and trim. Trunk lid is fine.
    We have owned the car since new, and while no concours points, I think I would like to fix it.
    Apparently a "total loss", less salvage valve. No numbers yet. Anyone have experience with this process?
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    MGarrison

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    Only through hearing many similar stories to yours - it's a double-edged sword having 'normal' insurance on an old car; the typical scenario is your insurance costs are quite low due to the car's age, but because of the age, the normal valuation is so low any kind of damage or claim means it's an automatic total in terms of the repair expense in relation to the valuation for such an old car. There's no consideration/accomodation in that type of insurance for a vehicle which is well-cared for and is in much better condition compared to something identical that would have just been a daily driver for however many years or decades, it's condition reflecting what it typically would be with that many years of age, mileage, & usage.

    I think it can be a bit of challenge to prove otherwise to an insurance company, you have to present records, receipts, maintenance, comparables, sales, auctions, etc. - basically every bit of evidence you can come up with to prove to them that your particular vehicle can justifiably have a higher valuation.

    One option is to accept whatever they'll pay and keep the car, which possibly means it having to have a salvage title, and be out-of-pocket for whatever the repairs cost above whatever miniscule amount you get. If whatever they offer is exceedingly low, you have to gauge whether just paying to get it fixed might be worth it not being saddled with a salvage title forevermore. Getting an accurate estimate would also be pretty key, 2002's are not like E30's - parts are rarer & harder to come by, some possibly being NLA; point being, basing a repair estimate for your car off of E30 parts listings may have the potential to substantially underestimate needed repairs.

    You might want to hit up https://www.bmw2002faq.com/forums/ for info, good chance there you'll find all the expertise you need, including suggestions for repair shops. These guys are way so-cal, but maybe have a norcal recommendation: http://www.bimmerdoc.com/

    You might want to try asking the club ombudsmen for any suggestions too. Unfortunately, it's probably an uphill battle for a higher evaluation, but I have heard of some having success with enough effort. If you do get it fixed, it might be worth considering a specialty insurer like Hagerty or doing stated-value insurance. Always hate to hear of someone's treasured vintage bimmer suffering harm, hope you're uninjured though!
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    Craig25569

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    Thank you for the tips.
    I am going to end up with a salvage title...I think Geico (the insurance company of the person who hit me) has been pretty fair....although a fair amount of time with estimates, salvage value etc. (not what I needed to be doing at the moment). Since the car has been in the family since new it has some sentimental value as well as issues from having taught my kids and many of the neighbors how to drive stick (possibly not a useful skill...but), and being at high school parking lots through two children....so I will be bringing it home tomorrow and starting the process of finding parts and reasonable repair help. With over 300,000 miles (second engine and a transmission rebuild) it isn't a queen anyway...and there is minimal rust (CA car) to go along with the dings.
    I may keep posting a description of the saga.
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    MGarrison

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    I'd say knowing how to drive a manual is a useful skill for everyone, but pitifully there are ever-fewer who do; also not a bad way to hopefully imbue some degree of car-culture enthusiasm so they might carry that torch forward. Makes driving engaging, interesting, & fun as opposed to considering it drudgery.

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