Hello there and welcome to the BMW Car Club of America.

If you are a BMW CCA member, please log in and introduce yourself in our Member Introductions section.

Oil changes - the simple things

Discussion in 'DIY (Do-It-Yourself)' started by az3579, Oct 6, 2008.

    • Member

    az3579

    Post Count: 3,270
    Likes Received:3
    There are things that usually aren't covered in DIY guides, such as this:

    If you're doing an oil change yourself, how exactly do you clean the oil drain pan after the old oil's been emptied? I'm afraid to rinse it off with the hose because I think the oil gets into the sewage and that isn't good. How is oil cleaned out of the pan?
    • Member
    • Technical Service Advisor

    mooseheadm5

    Post Count: 1,880
    Likes Received:15
    Let it drain for a long time into the container that you move the used oil in. Then a quick spray with solvent, which can get recycled with the oil.
    1 people like this.
    • Member

    MGarrison

    Post Count: 2,851
    Likes Received:146
    for the solvent part - I use CRC Brake Parts Cleaner, but there's plenty of options out there. And ya, never discard of any grease, oil, coolant, etc. in street drains or storm sewers; if it's bad for YOU to ingest it, it ain't gonna be any better for any other part of the ecosystem, or to risk it getting into the water table, or have to be processed by the water works.

    Also, always secure any coolant - animals are attracted to coolant because it has a sweet odor; they'll drink it without being able to know it's lethal effects. Just fyi.
    • Member

    az3579

    Post Count: 3,270
    Likes Received:3
    So what's being said is spray some solvent into the pan before draining the oil and then just drain it and it'll be fine? I don't like the thought of not cleaning it after it's been drained, which is why I asked in the first place. Sludge can build up in the pan as well, which is why I wanted to clean it in the first place so there's no blockages and I get my full 16 quart's worth!
    • Member
    • Technical Service Advisor

    mooseheadm5

    Post Count: 1,880
    Likes Received:15
    I meant spray solvent into the oil drain pan after pouring all of the oil into the recycling container, then letting that drain into said recycling container.

    DO NOT use CRC brake clean in the red can if you plan on recycling the oil. Our oil recycler got all over us about the chlorine content of our oil because we did this. Use only non-chlorinated brake clean in the green CRC can. For all other uses, I prefer the red stuff, but you CANNOT recycle it with your oil!
    • Member

    MGarrison

    Post Count: 2,851
    Likes Received:146
    Yes, ditto - let the oil drain out of your catch pan for awhile (an hour or two, or overnight), then spray it out.

    That's good to know - that's one of those things you only might hear from a professional! ;)
    • Member

    az3579

    Post Count: 3,270
    Likes Received:3
    Well, what to do with the oil is a whole 'nother dilemma. I don't think the shop across the street would be too happy to take my oil considering I do my own oil changes. :)


    That definitely answers my question though. Thanks!
    • Member

    granthr

    Post Count: 1,583
    Likes Received:2
    az3579 you might be surprised, they might be happy to take your oil. Most places I have recycled my oil to are happy to take it. They either sell it or burn it to heat their shop, so it is really a benefit to them. So you might as well ask.

    GR
    • Member

    garageboy

    Post Count: 6
    Likes Received:0
    Please clarify

    Having a couple older BMWs, this is interesting to me.

    Are you saying that after draining the oil, I can spray CRC Brake Cleaner (yes, the green can) directly into the drain plug hole and let if fall out (through same hole) and drain?

    What is the benefit of doing this?

    Is this while the engine is still warm after draining the oil for 10-15 minutes? Or do I do it the next day?

    Since I don't have any visual access into my oil pan, and believe there to be some sludge accumulated after over 250K miles (20 yrs), I'm concerned whether this does more harm than good.

    Am I to assume any remainder will evaporate quickly enough not to get mixed in with the new oil? Do I have to wait some period before closing up the drain plug?

    Thanks for your thoughts,
    .steve.
    • Member
    • Technical Service Advisor

    mooseheadm5

    Post Count: 1,880
    Likes Received:15
    You can, but I wouldn't unless you have a reason. We are talking about the recepticle into which you drain used engine oil begore taking it to be recycled.

    As for used oil, many shops take it, and most auto parts stores do as well.

    Jeron guest

    Post Count: 210
    Likes Received:2
    My favorite drain pan is actually a bucket I bought from a parts store. The bucket holds about 5 gallons and the lid is a drainpan, upside down. So after the oil change I dump the drainpan (lid) into the bucket and just put the lid on the bucket and it sits until the next oil change.

    Most of the time however, I use vacuum extraction and when I'm done reverse the suction on my extractor to push the fluid into 1 gallon oil bottles.

    194648 guest

    Post Count: 30
    Likes Received:0
    I just set the drain pan on edge on a funnel, that is

    connected to my 5 gallon oil container, and leave it this way for a few days, and almost all but a light film of oil will be left on the drain pan. A quick wipe with a couple of paper towels, and there is not much of anything left in the drain pan. Put the drain pan in a big plastic bag that closes, and put away until next time. Take the 5 gal container to the auto parts store and dump it into their 55-gallon drum, and they are happy as heck cause they sell it to the recycler. They will take your paper towels too and dump them for you.
    DanF

Share This Page