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No wheel lock key. Now what?

Discussion in 'Wheels & Tires' started by Stuart Cooperrider, Dec 22, 2012.

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    Stuart Cooperrider

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    Just noticed the 2009 328i that I recently bought CPO has one lock wheel lock per wheel. Have no way of tracing previous owner for key. Need to put on winter wheels. What is the best way to get existing locks off? Thanks.
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    steven s

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    Hate to state the obvious, no chance it's in the tool compartment?
    Or maybe bring it to a local tire shop?
    I'm sure you're not the first they've seen.

    Lots of You Tube videos

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    Stuart Cooperrider

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    Thanks Steven. I'm holding the technique shown in thousands of similar Google videos as a last resort.
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    Stuart Cooperrider

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    Anyone know what brand this is? I need to replace the key.
    Lock.JPG
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    MGarrison

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    Looks like a Mcgard to me...

    http://www.mcgard.com/automotive-2/wheel-locks/bolt-style

    See FAQ #4: http://www.mcgard.com/customer-service/faqs

    I googled 'how to remove mcgard wheel lock' & 'how to remove mcgard locking wheel nut'

    If it doesn't have a spinning slip collar, some of the suggestions were to weld a bolt-head/nut to it, air chisel, send a photo to mcgard, contact mcgard with the wheel lock's ID/pattern info for a replacement, drilling it out (sounded difficult, hardened steel), and jamming a socket over the lock head so that it's so tight it will grip enough to allow for removal. Sears has damaged bolt removers, I don't know if those would work, or work better than a conventional socket. That was some quick searching, you may want to check search results more extensively. There was also a mention that tire stores might have a master set in case of finding a customer without their key.

    http://www.unitedbimmer.com/forums/...heel-lock-removal-ghetto-mode-diy-mcgard.html
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    Stuart Cooperrider

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    Thanks for the quick reply. Our minds are in the same place. Have e-mailed a pic to McGuard, have visited several large and small tire centers, have visited an auto security products shop, called several mechanics, Googled the bejusus out of it using an expansive range of keywords and phrases, have posted on e90 forums, have visited my local BMW dealership, texted all the Kardashians, sent a note to Click and Clack, posted (as you know) to BMWCCA, e-mailed Snap-on Tools and consulted my Magic 8 ball twice because I didnt like the first answer. I'm feeling confident.
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    Stuart Cooperrider

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    Thanks everyone for the replies. I cast a wide net. Turned out to be Mcguard. E-mailed a pic of the lock, straight on shot. Got a fast reply from Mcguard and confirmation it was theirs. $15.00 + shipping and a new key was delivered fast. Great customer service. Never heard back from the Kardashians.
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    MGarrison

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    Magic 8-ball is never wrong. I'm convinced it's the driving force behind all congressional legislation. Glad you got it worked out; I had thought about suggesting some sort of reverse casting process to make your own key, but couldn't think of any practical way to end up with a key strong enough - plus, Mcgard's replacement solution, waaaay easier. :)

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