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Intermittent fan

Discussion in 'E36 M3 (1995-1999)' started by m3rick, Jul 16, 2011.

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    m3rick

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    I have an E36 M3 and the AC blower fan is doing funny things. It works sometimes and not other times. I don't think the fan motor is bad but something is causing it to act strange. Any ideas?
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    John in VA

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    Do a search for "E36 FSR"...

    Your final stage resistor probably needs replacing.

    spin.cycle guest

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    Agree w John in VA. This is

    Agree w John in VA. This is a relatively easy and very inexpensive fix. Pelican Parts has a decent write-up with pix.

    The job is easier if you have the plastic interior trim tools (ref. Bavarian Auto & other BMW suppliers), but one or two paint scrapers will do the trick if you don't. Some additional comments:

    > The male socket on the internal fan connector to the circuit board has a small retaining tab. Use a small flat-blade screw driver to gently create enough space for the tab to slide up & out of the female socket.

    > Insert small flat-blade screw drivers into the metal tabs on either side of the plastic box holding the circuit board. Use the screw drivers to expand the box & release the circuit board. You can try to pry the circuit board tabs from their detent, but I found that method to be a PITA. It seems to me the metal tabs on each side of the box are there to be used as prying points.

    > There is apparently a bit of flexibility in the replacement capacitor ("cap") specs. The OEM cap is .47uF; I used a 1uF cap to repair my E36 M3. So far, no problems.

    > When removing the old cap, it is easier if you have an assistant pull / wiggle gently on the cap while you apply heat to the backside of the circuit board.

    > The new cap may be physically bigger than the failed unit. Be sure you install the new cap so that it will fit inside the box. I ended up leaving the cap standing a little tall on the circuit board. Bending it slightly toward the circuit board allowed the board to slide back into the box with no probs.

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