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Castrol TWS 10w-60

Discussion in 'E85/E86 Z4 M roadster/coupe (2006-2008)' started by 330indy1, Oct 14, 2008.

    • Member

    330indy1

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    a friend from BITOG sent me this info. Thought you guys would appreciate the insights.

    **

    1 - ALPINA worked on its formulation with Castrol/BMW
    2 - It suits DI engines due to its viscosity namely HTHS @ 5.4cP
    3 - It has an excellent Pour Point (-42C) which is much better than some lighter viscosity lubricants
    4 - It was progressively developed from 1997 as a low chlorine/minimised phosphorous lubricant

    Its part ester/part PAO base has been constructed over a period of 30 years on an excellent development path

    In its early life is was used by Sauber-Mercedes winning at LeMans and in Formula 1 engines (Ford-Cosworth). It was used at one point by Porsche in some race engines. It was also used here in the V8Supercars ZF six speed gearboxes with great success

    It is a bit like a heavy weight version of M1 0W-40 or Delvac 1 5W-40 in its formulation.
    **

    snikwad guest

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    Now that's cool :)
    Almost makes me wanna go buy some and switch.
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    ganseg

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    I thought that reducing phosphorous was bad for "high performance engines"?
    • Member

    330indy1

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    reduced phosphorous is probably better for the catalysts. Old school high friction (valvetrain) engines like the friction enhancers, phosphorous, zinc, whatever, but I don't think new tech engines like the S54 (which is low friction) need it.
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    ganseg

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    Cool, thanks.

    Also i found this searching bitog:

    In response to reduced phosporous numbers alowed in ILSAC oils the additive makers have been working on longer chain ZDDP's. ASHLAND seems to have come up with a marketable variety first and is cashing in on the Phosporous retention, in light of a tight lubriocant market it behooves them to use this technological breakthrough and Market it. This is indeed another step forward.

    With older ZDDP's the Phosporous volatizes rapidly and is soon depleted thus the need for the larger amounts of it. By increasing Phosporous retention they are effectively increasing the usefull life and wear protection even though the phosporous numbers are below 700 PPM. Thus less is more.

    Edited by Bryanccfshr (11/15/08 09:53 PM)

    Both are encouraging. In the mean time, I continue to use M1 0W40 in my '97 M3. :)
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    330indy1

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    thanks to M1 0w-40, I have a leaky valve-cover gasket in my e39...
    :(
    it's too darn thin.....
    • Member

    ganseg

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    I don't think it is thin oil. THe valve cover gasket is a plasticy material that dries out. I let mine leak for months and after I changed it, I was sorry I waited. It got oil all over everything, could have ruined my spark plug boots and engine mounts. THe job wasn't hard or expensive - and it leaked with 15W50 as well. I recommend changing it.
    • Member

    330indy1

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    going to have it replaced next oil change/ soon
    • Member

    330indy1

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    I also recently read this thread over at BITOG. Quite interesting... the phosphorous supposedly turns into a hard glass-like coating on the metal parts, and reduces the likelihood of metal to metal contact. neat!

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