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15K Oil Change Interval - Any Problems?

Discussion in 'E46 (1999-2006)' started by Rich Rulli, Apr 3, 2008.

    cougarclaws guest

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    I used to be in manufacturing, and the goal is 100k for the average car. Most people do not take care of their vehicles, and this is the reason. Thank you for deciding for me what I as an American believe. I stated that BMW wants their cars to survive well over the 100k mark. Perhaps focusing on what you want to focus in on in a post is a way for you to insult others, but I do not appreciate it in the least. I stated fact. Your car dying at 188k is a prime example....you did not take proper care of the vehicle.
    The only rubbish I see here, is you referring to anyone else as "stupid or foolish".
    I appreciate your points, mine was simply that 100k is the goal under most conditions. It is very clear to me that you have little or no engineering background, and also lack in understanding of social behavior. For many years, certain cars were built to drive until they die.
    If cars were designed to cross the 100k threshold, then warranties would reflect that as well. A well maintenance truck can run as far as 1 million miles before a major rebuild.

    snikwad guest

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    using your own words, focus on what you want to focus on, i said that mentality is stupid and foolish. i never called you stupid or foolish. If the cap fits, wear it.
    im well aware of why my engine died in my other car, i simply didnt care and was just driving it till it died, and refused to put any money or time into it, my other vehicles are pretty well maintained.
    you should be so sensitive, if youre that sensitive you should clarify your statements in your post. you closed your post by saying "More than 100k on any car is simply a bonus." then you get all butt hurt when i say that that kind of thinking is stupid, but, what do i know you're the engineer, and psychologist.
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    shanneba

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    Oil analysis at ~5000 mile intervals

    If anyone would like to see how the BMW 5w-30 and Castrol Syntec 0w-30 (BMW LL-01 approved) has done in my 2003 330Ci here are the analysis results:

    http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forum...rds= shanneba&topic=0&Search=true#Post1125197

    Much of my driving is around town, short trips, 5 miles or so. The oil does better with highway miles, the one UOA of 5900 miles includes two trips from Houston to Indianapolis about 4400 of the total miles.

    My OEM diff fluid analysis from about 38000 miles is also posted on those forums. Quite a bit of good reading about oil / fluids at Bob is the oil guy dot com.

    cougarclaws guest

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    I would expect this for a short trip engine. Would love to see the comparison using conventional.

    ecoBMW guest

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    It's a gorgeous day here in the STL, so I changed the engine oil in the M54. I'm a 5K mileage interval changer, I use Castrol SYNTEC 5w30 fully synthetic.

    bradley01 guest

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    Take your ~$50 and...

    [IMG]

    ;)
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    330indy1

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    yup, fo sho
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    Naka

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    Synthetic vs Regular

    Here's a blurb from an article that might interest some; didn't put all of it in to cut down the space.

    Because a synthetic oil is chemically produced, there are no contaminants in the oil. By contrast, conventional oils contain small amounts of sulfur, wax, and asphaltic material that can promote detonation as well as varnish and sludge buildup. With no wax, synthetics will flow at much lower temperatures than conventional oils. In fact, synthetic oils are now available with viscosity ratings as low as 0W-30, as in Mobil 1's new Tri-Synthetic blend or Castrol Formula SLX. These oils flow more than seven times faster than a conventional 5W-30 motor oil during initial start-up, yet at normal operating temperatures act like a regular Grade 30 oil.

    An 0W-30 synthetic oil is capable of pumping easily at -62 degrees F and flowing at even lower temperatures. Conventional oils are essentially frozen solid at that temperature, so there's simply no conventional equivalent to this new grade. There are 5W-30 conventional and synthetic oils, but even here, the synthetic has a real-world advantage: Mobil 1's 5W-30 will pump at -58-degrees F, compared to about -35-degrees F for a conventional oil.



    But claims and talk are cheap, so Car Craft had Westech Performance run some of the new Mobil 1 0W-30 in Ford's prototype 392 small-block stroker crate engine. The Mobil 1 was compared to the generic (and recommended for this engine) 20W-50 factory-fill conventional oil, as well as 10W-30 conventional oil. All tests began with the oil temperature stabilized at 210 degrees F. The engine ran from 3,300-6,200 rpm, and several runs were made for each oil to ensure repeatability.

    In terms of peak numbers, we found that the engine gained nearly 7 hp with the thinner conventional oil, and was up nearly 10 hp with the synthetic. No peak torque gains were observed by changing from 20W-50 to 10W-30 conventional; however, the synthetic was up 15 lb-ft of torque at the peak. Looking at average numbers helps explain where the gains occurred--both the thinner conventional and synthetic oils broadened the torque and power bands overall, but the thin Mobil 1 showed the greatest improvement under 4,700 rpm, indicating that the thinner oil provides less initial drag for the engine to overcome.

    However, thinner oil also translates to lower oil pressure: The 0W-30 oil developed 10 psi less than the baseline 20W-50. Only 46 psi was on tap at 6,200 rpm--kind of shaky as most gearheads like to see at least 10 psi per 1,000 rpm. Still, the engine ran OK, and the bearings looked fine on teardown, seemingly verifying synthetic manufacturers' claims that their products' greater shear strength more than makes up for lower viscosity. Is 10 hp and 15 lb-ft worth paying two to four times more for a quart of oil? Or the potential for extended engine life? You be the judge.

    http://www.carcraft.com/techarticles/synthetic_vs_conventional_oil/index.html

    tester123 guest

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    mhmmm seems to be

    cougarclaws guest

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    Nice! I still think it should be illegal to run conventional oils as a lubricant. Pretty ignorant considering gas prices and such. If we started running synthetics for lubrication, the demand for conventional oil would decrease, and so would prices. Even if prices stayed high, it would take away another oil company excuse. I will still run 7500 average between oil changes in my new E92 because of the added protection and my paranoia. But it is synthetics all the way!

    bradley01 guest

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    +1
    I couldn't agree more!

    Jeron guest

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    Synthetic motor oil is made from conventional petroleum, a likely more of it is need because the extra processes required to make it. If you use synthetic and dont extend you drain interval you are increasing demand.

    If you want to help reduce demand for petroleum and reduce gas/oil prices then use extended oil changed 15k+ based on oil analysis.

    bradley01 guest

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    That doesn't seem right. They way I understand it is they are made from a combination of chemicals, specifically acid esters and diesters...yada yada yada. If you have proof that full synthetic motor oil is made from conventional petroleum, I would like to read your source. Educate me! ;)

    cougarclaws guest

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    Yes, please!!! Since I was under the impression "synthetic" means not the real thing, I would love to be educated here. I was told by the manufacturer representative that petroleum breaks down, and does not have the same properties as synthetics. Even if some petroleum is used, does it constitute the same amount as regular motor oil? Would we still be using petroleum in the same quantities if we use a synthetic? Does every manufacturer use the same chemicals and processes in their synthetics?

    Help me understand...

    Thanks

    Jeron guest

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    To be called Synthetic it must be made from Group III, Group IV or Group V base oil. Practically all synthetic is made from Group III or IV.

    Group III is highly refined crude.
    Group IV is PAO which is chemically restructured petroleum.

    http://www.7thgear.net/7thGear/Default.aspx?tabid=27

    It is difficult to find Group IV proof on the web because of Synthetic Marketing careful wording to differentiate Synthetic Oil from Conventional Oil.

    I like this one:
    http://www.oilweb1.com/Technical_Information/About_Synthetic_Oil.htm
    It says, "Synthetic oil is oil manufactured from chemical compounds which are not found in crude oil." True, they are chemically restructured into different compounds.

    It also says, "Today, when synthetic oil is made as a substitute for lubricants refined from petroleum...". The key word is "refined" because PAO is no made with a refining process.

    Heres a good one:
    http://www.performanceoiltechnology.com/whataresyntheticlubricants.htm
    "The general manufacturing process used to form PAO's is performed by combining a low molecular weight material, usually ethylene gas, into a specific olefin which is oligomerized into a lubricating oil material and then hydrogen stabilized."

    Ethylene and olefin are petroleum products.

    Finally here is a mention of oil refineries and their crude oil and synthetic oil production.
    http://www.industrialheartland.com/pages/investments.html

    Jeron guest

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    1 people like this.

    cougarclaws guest

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    I stand corrected. I see your point. I do however run to 7500 miles....This is twice what manufaturers recommend (except BMW), and I still hold to my statement that it should be illegal to run anything but synthetic oil as a lubricant. In my truck, I run for 25000 miles as do my parents on their vehicles (my mother's Expedition has 291000 miles on it and no major engine work and the dealership says they know it will go 500000), or one year with a filter change at 12000 or six months. Amsoil is the brand I use for the truck. So, yes I do my part. I cannot do this in an engine I run to 8400 RPM as it makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up.
    Thanks for the enlightenment, I obviously misunderstood what I was told.

    Also, some racing rings will not seat with a synthetic, so we have had to run a conventional for 20 minutes first, then switch to synthetic. I say this because engines are not all the same.

    cougarclaws guest

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    OH you mean like "psuedo".

    Learn something new everyday...

    Thanks again!

    bradley01 guest

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    Ditto. Thanks for the edumacation today! I was unaware that there was ANY petroleum in a "fully" synthetic engine lubricant. (hence the "fully") I, like cougar, change my oil at longer intervals. I change my oil every 10k miles with a filter change at mid point. I don't change mine at 7.5k miles because I don't run her hard. She is my daily driver...not a track car. I bet if I ran the $&!t out of her, I would most certainly be changing my oil more often. Again, thanks for the lesson today, Jeron.

    Jeron guest

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